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Contents:
  1. Ron Sturgeon
  2. THESE SUCCESSFUL ENTREPRENEURS SHARE:
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  5. Green Weenies & Due Diligence

Ron Sturgeon

A Step by Step Path to YES Ron, an experienced entrepreneur and Greg, a seasoned bank president, who both have scars from their experiences, often approach this timely topic from different perspectives. Read more snippets from the book. Chapter 6 A Loan, Again? Read More. Sturgeon is well known in the automotive, banking, and real estate circles of North Texas.


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He is a renowned small business consultant and speaker, and has served as the keynote speaker for many business associations. Ron Sturgeon has been building and running successful businesses for many years. Past Exhibitions.

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In the Vietnam era, Green Weenie was a fictitious, ultra-virulent, incurable STD that could be acquired in the East Asian theater that resulted in not only the descriptive coloration but the eventual shriveling and loss of the affected appendage. I'm only a little younger than Simpson. In my university days, "The Green Weenie" signified the end of a relationship. I guess it's back to beer and bridge this weekend. These are what we called "Green Weenies" or "Greenie Weenies", they're JUST the green scouring pad without the sponge, when you're in boot camp and you hear "get on the deck and start using your green weenies on that" you really wonder what the motivation was for naming it that.

On the air, Rachel Maddow went with a different explanation :. It is a green weenie with oak leaf clusters, which sounds very much like a military word. So then we did what anybody would do in this situation at this point in this investigation. We contacted the awesome reference librarians at the U. Military Academy at West Point to help us. Thanks to them, and they were truly awesome, we can tell you with some confidence that Alan Simpson's use of the term "green weenie," which so upset Candy Crowley this weekend, was probably him employing a slang term for the army commendation medal.

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Why is that called a green weenie? Well, the "Dictionary of Soldier Talk" says, quote, "The army commendation medal was about the only decoration for meritorious service or achievement that most enlisted men and junior officers could hope to win. Later, when the decoration passed out indiscriminately, the term 'weenie' began to make sense.

Don't look at me. I did not write it. So now, we know what a green weenie is.

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And it would make sense. You know, I mean, think about what's going on here, giving out a green weenie for not cutting very much spending.

That would be consistent with its slang meaning as a sort of undeserved anti-award that you get for nothing. It makes sense. The Green Weenie was a green plastic rattle in the shape of a hot dog, which when waved at opposing players, purportedly put a jinx on them. Conversely, when waved at Pirate players it allegedly bestowed good luck.

The superstition began during a game against the Houston Astros, when Danny Whelan shouted from the dugout at Astros' pitcher Dave Giusti, "You're gonna walk him! Giusti did walk the batter, and the Astros lost the game.


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During the next game's broadcast, Prince quizzed Whelan about the frankfurter incident, and the gimmick was born. Within weeks, Green Weenies were being sold to fans at Forbes Field.

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Green Weenies & Due Diligence

William Skinner, " The China Quarterly For me, Bill Skinner was 42 years of superlatives. The tallest, the thinnest, the blondest, the nattiest, the fussiest, the courtliest, the earliest, the tardiest, the scariest, the grammatically stickliest, the most systematic, the most synthetic, the most eclectic, the most perfectionist, the greatest connoisseur, the hardest worker, the most loyal, the most generous, the most intimidating, the most inspiring, the most interesting, the most important person in my professional life.

Sometime in Fall as an audacious year-old junior, I found my way through the sandstone columns of Stanford's Old Union to the temporary office of some new professor who taught the anthropology of China, to ask if I could enrol in his Winter Contemporary Chinese Society class without the prerequisite. Why did he agree? He asked me where I had done my undergraduate work, and loaded me down with a thick syllabus and bibliography list.

Even as an undergraduate I felt his magnetism and his intellectual force. Like everyone else in the China studies community at Stanford, I both got what we called The Green Weenie — "It's a nice paper, but it shows an almost militant disregard for all important theoretical considerations" — and received the benefit of hours' worth of tiny squiggles from his famous Red Pen, culminating in summary comments like "very encouraging," or "deserves further work.